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20121222
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Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
of russia's retaliation against an american law that puts sanctions on officials suspected of human rights violations. some senior government officials in moscow have spoken out against that law, but supporters argue the ban's necessary, because some adopted children have faced abuse by american families. joining me from moscow now is steve rosenberg. steve, you said he'd do it, he's done it. >> that's right, david. there's been one question that has dominated political life in moscow the last few days and that is will he or won't he? will president putin sign what is one of the most controversial laws he's been face with. yesterday he indicated he probably would and today he signed it. as you mentioned it has been very controversial because a number of ministers in his own government, including the russian foreign minister have publicly criticized the law and president putin's critics have accused him of playing politics with russian children. >> criticized it on humanitarian grounds. >> yes, absolutely. it's interesting to note that the bill we're talking about, the law we're talking abo
with president obama signature before becoming law. >> lifting the restrictions allowing net flicks his additional there was also to media outlets by facebook and twitter. >> the new feature will be available to use in the u.s. starting the new year. >> continuing to track gas price across the bay area the average price of private picture posted by mark zuckerbergs sister on a parcel that the profile of the lead. facebook marketing directors of following them posted on twitter count for more than $40,000 to sea. >> and his sister ready to it at the facebook directors and a picture was meant for france only. >> content to dry gas price across bay area the average price per gallon of regular gasoline remains at three rows in sentences col. $3.49 and oakland. $3.50 in san jose. and at $3 system to sent here in california statewide. >> to toyota settled with our orders over unintended acceleration in 2009 and 2010. >> and a glass agreed to pay more than a billion dollars to install new safety features to compensate owners. >> drivers to toyota because floor mats for getting stuck, causing t
before the health care law kicks in. so, we are moving in that direction, particularly in the entitlement state. not reforming it, but actually expanding it. >> aen what happened this year was the supreme court helping this along, you have the justices essentially rewrite legislation changing the plain text that congress passed in order to declare obamacare constitutional, which is a little scary, that that highest justices in the land would take that sort of activist role and you mentioned france, dan, that's scary. the back drop of this whole presidential year is europe. we know where the path leads. and the turmoil and welfare states and how unsustainability and the high unemployment that comes with them and that was the back drop of our presidential campaign. >> paul: okay, the voters said, yeah, we're going to keep moving in that direction, kim. i mean, how, what do you think the electorate is here, behind the choices that jason just suggested they might be? >> barack obama won this election by very effectively making this a referendum about his opponent, mitt romney. so if you went
walker. he put through his right to work laws. he didn't want a recall. he was an inspiration for republican governors. it's a move gone all over the country. >> best politician bill clinton, who in a single speech at the democratic national convention injected energy and enthusiasm into the voters. >> herman cain was the leading republican contender. however, he was also the worst politician, but i'll get to that later. >> i had a long shot in naming chris christie because he firmed up his base in a democratic state. and i think at a time when the republicans now are seeing a resurgence among their moderates. i think in the long run he may prove to be the big winner of the year. >> these are all very interesting choices but they are all domestic. the best politician of 2012 was german chancellor angela merkle. she had to walk a tightrope between her german voters who do not favor bailing out europe and the european union. best politician, angela. you got it? you can write that down. pat, put it in your column. worst politician. >> susan rice. she was fed these phony talking p
in the house so it's got no chance whatsoever of becoming law, end quote. that's what i said back on july 25th. the only reason we ever allowed that vote on that proposal is i said at that time was that we knew it didn't pass constitutional muster. and the democrats were really serious, they would proceed to a revenue bill that originated in the house as the constitution requires and as i called on them to do again last week. to repeat, the so-called nate bill is nothing more than a glorified sense of the senate resolution. so let's put that convenient talking point aside from here on out. last night i told the president we'd be happy to look at whatever he proposes but the truth is we're coming up against a hard deadline here and, as i said, this is a conversation we should have had months ago. and republicans aren't about to write a blank check or anything senate democrats put forward just because we find ourselves at the edge of the cliff. that wouldn't be fair to the american people. that having been said, we'll see what the president has to propose. members on both sides of the aisle will
to the people of cuba. the helms-burton law was not as effective as i would have liked. >> another issue out you are associated with is autism. how did that get started? >> my grandson was a very normal child. when he was 18 months to two years old, he got nine shots in one day. seven of which had thimerosol, mercury. it is a preservative. in 1929 it was tested on the 29 people who had meningitis. they said that the mercury had no impact so they started using solutions.halmologic when children get a few vaccinations, it did not have a huge impact but they started to get as many as 25 or 30 before they get to the first grade. my grandson got nine in one day and he became artistic, banging his head against the wall. then diary and constipation -- diarrhea and constipation. he was doing terrible. i was not aware of autism and all but i was chairman of the committee that did the investigation so i started to looking into with health and human services and the food and drug administration and that is where i had four years of hearings on that and i became convinced that women -- that mercury, women w
they want to bill, the infrastructure, the programs they make into law. guest: i think james hits on the virtue of a flat tax, having a low, single rate, getting rid of all the loopholes in the tax code and having the government learn to live within its means. that would take some time, but it is eminently doable with positive reforms on the entitlement for younger people. you do not have to change the benefit formulas for those on medicare or social security or who are about to go on those systems. as younger people know, those systems are headed for a crash. the sooner we reform them in a positive way, the better. the key to do it is not by raising taxes, but by having a low single rate and they learn to live within it. i think you'll have a much more prosperous country for it. host: let's end where we started. what do you think the best solution in your personal view and your business view is to the fiscal cliff situation? guest: aside from not doing something foolish and the next three or four days -- that is why i do not mind kicking the can down the road -- would be to follo
in the united states is due to this one particular law passed in the 980s. -- 1980s. okay, then how does that account for rising income inequality in canada or, indeed, even in france, in germany, in the united kingdom? i mean, it's happening all over the world, it's also happening in emerging markets. but i think it is important to face that scary because if you see it just as a political phenomenon, you know, you're going to lose sight of what i think is the biggest challenge which is that these, actually, quite benign economic forces, right? i love the technology revolution, i'm a google addict. they're also drivers of social and political consequences which are not quite so benign. the way i like to look at it, and this is a quote from peter orszag, is, you know, how he sees it is he said, look, the big drivers are probably these economic forces, but the issue is that particularly in the united states the politics instead of trying to mitigate these very powerful economic forces has exacerbated them. so even as you have these economic forces creating much, much more concentration at
% of the boat. the government agrees -- there's a lot, under greek law whatever party comes in first, take a step back, greece has proportional representation that deserves a word of comment. proportional representation is the peculiar idea that if you get a certain percentage of the vote in an election, you should have the same percentage of delegates in congress that right the laws. it you didn't do that you exclude the 18% that had a role to play in governing which you think is the idea. in european countries we have proportional representation. if you get more than usually a cut off of 5% to get whatever the percentage of your vote is that is how many seats you get. you all understand i assume we don't do that in united states. if you get 51% of the vote you get it all and 49% wage. we have had proportional representation in the united states in the past. when you read about primary, and they a gets 20 delegates for the convention and candidate b, that is proportional, they get an equal number of delegates, we actually recognized in the united states proportional representation, we jus
, now that the affordable care act will begin to become fully finalized into law over the next couple years, we keep hearing those on the conservative side is concerns about what it will do to the country. what are your concerns? will this be a good thing? >> yes, it will. right now, we have $50 billion a year of uncompensated care. people who do not have insurance, do not have medicaid, medicare, private insurance, mode carry coverage, they are not insured. they have access to health care in emergency rooms and if they cannot pay, and they do not go to bankruptcy, it costs -- the care does not go away. it is shifted to the rest of us who do have insurance. $50 billion. it could be as much as $1,500 per person. paying for those who do not. you have everybody in the system all injured one way or another, then the uncompensated care goes away. it is no longer borne by those of us who are beneficiaries of an insurance program. that alone is a hidden tax people do not focus on unless it is pointed out to them. it raises the cost to everyone else. the fact never gets talked about. should.
into law. if you're among republicans is if you reach an agreement now and agree to tax increases, the spending cuts will get undone or never will be followed through on. that's one of the things that has held back talks, because republicans are skeptical that democrats will follow through. host: charles is on the independent line from colorado. caller: good morning, steve. i listened to it the myopic dogma in this segment over and over. the only people i can blame on this are the american people. the people who sit here and listen to these guys that are extremists and and they vote him into office -- them into office. i hear people say let's get rid of epa. if you look at how much epa takes out of our budget, that's like worrying about nothing gary people need to turn off the tv and start studying more. crack some books. look at economic spirit trickle-down economics does not work. name a country where it has worked? maybe estonia. but it's not working in greece. i heard a great saying that says when time gets tough, everyone is a keynesian. turn off the tv. not c-span of course.
of whether americans and the second amendment have a right to purchase and own firearms legally for lawful purpose, i don't think we will get to an area of agreement. we can agree on some things and at least we can agree that people who exercise their rights who have no reason to be suspected of having done anything wrong shouldn't be demonized because some paper disagrees with them. i think we can agree on that and what's important is that as we have this conversation in the days following the newtown massacre, the conversation should be rational. >> in utah, 200 public school teachers necessary class today learning how to handle firearms and practicing with plastic hand guns. a special training is being offered by the top gun lobby and waived the $50 fee. that's one of the few states that allowed weapons to be carried at schools. the principal told me that since the sandy hook school massacre his school made changes. you said teachers should have the right to defend themselves and personally you would not like it. what is the compromise here? how do we fix it? >> you know, we have a depu
that there ideas are not stolen either. rule of law, transparency, a neutral legal system -- how much time do you spend on piracy issues? -- system? >> how much time do you spend on piracy issues? >> a lot of time. the president was very clear the drive got to enforce the rules to insure fairness. china has benefited enormously from its secession from the wto. if we and united states are ever to have additional trade agreements with other countries, the american people and american congress have to believe that we will make sure that when we lower barriers and open our markets to companies from other countries, but those other countries will also do the same for america. that is why the president was very clear in the campaign. we're going to hold other countries feet to the fire to ensure a level playing field. >> do you think this is something that chinese leaders respond to? >> yes. the chinese leaders will try to give a push and see if you back up. and if you do, they will give you another push. they do respect strength. at some point you have to say, we cannot back up any more. on some of th
was the limit. that really was her view. it made me think i could do anything. i did go to law school. in the early 1980's when i got out of law school, i went back to tennessee to practice. i was going around to law firms. there were not that many women in the law firms. i had guys interview me. they would sit me down and say, do you understand you have to try cases? >> [laughter] >> i said that is what i wanted to do and was excited about it. i have clients in the beginning, i would go in to meet them. afterwards, one of my partners would say that they say that was not what i expected. he did not know there was going to be a lady lawyer on this case. but i really liked trying cases. it was a lot of fun. then i was drawn into politics. throughout my career, i have been interested in how to change things for the better. i have been very fortunate to have lots of opportunities to serve. >> you mentioned your mother. your mother died of lung cancer. she was such a force in your life. >> i think it made me very strong because it was very clear i had no one to depend on but me. >> 3 the o
minister who says he will consider changing the law governing central banks getting more politically involved. lori: we have larry in the pits of the cme. telling us why the pessimism on the fiscal cliff is making him bullish, believe it or not. and it is time to get defensive. larry, we will begin with you. how can you see this sorting out at the end of the day, a big deal, a little deal, no deal at all, what is the outcome? larry: the odds are pointing to a mini deal. expectations for a big deal are fading and fading quickly. it looks like it will be a mini deal with the tax extension will help those making under $250,000 per year and will not address the debt ceiling or spending or anything like that, it will be a patchwork of things that will make the market very nervous but given it is christmas eve, people are little bit negative but most christmas shopping. david: larry, round this time the irs issues its formal withholding guidance for the coming year. >> it'll be a bigger document than what we are used to because it will be giving guidance they are not sure even how to give
in their own pockets or they become lobbyists. this secreted a law that they should not be able to become lobbyists for a few years sucker they leave congress or senate. they need to just bring america back up. if it would bring more jobs back to america, then we would have more taxes to be collected. host: more in the financial times this morning. capitol hill plays out a cliffhanger is the headline. the right the mood of the members matches the state of negotiations, l tempered, resentful and having their christmas breaks interrupted by another partisan budget impasse and in no frame of mind a compromise. we are talking about the senate negotiating a on the air. caller: thank you for taking my call. i am going to join the democrats, at least most of them, i hope. i am so disgusted and so disheartened. i feel that the republicans are being obstructionists on purpose. that is obvious. anyhow, they need to -- it is not about parties and politics anymore. it comes down to looking out for america. ok? host: why do you think they are being obstructionist? what do they have to gain by doing th
the president needs to do. there is nothing he has to sign. as a matter of law the law changes in january and taxes go up. president doesn't have to do anything. he can sit back and as taxes go up on everybody including that 1% that he has been after, nothing has been done on spending. sequestration could be rolled back with retro activity where the president thinks he is better shape on spending in january. patti ann: alan? >> you forget the president offered boehner a deal to keep taxes keep the bush tax rate on 98% of the americans. keep those tax rates where they are. not raise taxes and boehner rejected that. he had opportunity -- excuse me, i'm still talking. he has opportunity now to do exactly what the republicans say they want and boehner rejects it. >> it is beyond revenue. it is about spending. that is our problem. >> you can stop going over cliff first of the year. >> what about spending that got us in bind we're in? none of the revenue that will be generated will make a dent in our spending especially the 6 trillion the president has --. patti ann: brad, democrats are arguing
. they shared with him the he was comfortable that these guys. at columbia law school, they were very good guys. it is true that obama did his best. when i interview president obama in the oval office, he talked about the supporters in new york. but he started to make that transition in his long arc of his search for home. she was starting to happen and beenu mahmood was very perceptively seen that happen. >> host: why did the presidency president in new york after graduating from columbia? >> guest: he was trying to get a job wherever he could. he applied for a job in chicago after washington was elected mayor there. he didn't get anything. so the best he could do was stay in new york. he wouldn't want to go back to honolulu. he didn't have anyplace else. so he stayed there and as he put it, you try to make money for yourself and get a job. it is sort of a magazine or consulting firm called business international. for that year, he doesn't really like it there, but that is the period when they talk a lot. it is the period when he met genevieve. >> host: so david maraniss, going back to the quo
. under the laws, those withholding rates are supposed to go up because, as you know, all thoughts tax cuts that were passed over a decade ago were supposed to expire. and the irs is basically on the sideline waiting to see what happens on the hill between them and the president to see if, in fact, there's a reason to tell the current employers, hold on, there will be a freeze on those rates. if, in fact, they have to go to the new guidance, consumers will start to feel very early the hit to their paychecks of having gone over the fiscal cliff, even if there's auto deal that retroactively drags us back over the top of the cliff. >> it's an interesting point. greg, thank you so much. such a mess. >>> it was better news at the box office lately. hollywood is on track to post an all-time box office record this year. film lovers have flocked the theaters to see christmas day performances of les miserables and "unchanged." >>> stick around. still to come on the show, the summer olympics and u.s. election made to 2012 a bumper user for advertisers. will that continue in 2013? we'll ask the c
'll see estate taxes go up, investment taxes go up. there is an endless list of expiring provisions of law that will, in fact, expire if nothing is done. and i think even if something is done at this point, what you're looking at is something very scaled back, something very small and congress will have to come back next year and take a look at trying to get to some of those other issues. >> alistair here. that sounds about right to me, assuming that that scenario is how things play out. what sort of impact medium term do you think this is going to have on consumer and corporate confidence in america, given that the fiscal cliff is clearly weighed heavily on both of those in recent months? >> the sad thing, you know, from an observer's standpoint here is that there isn't much corporate or consumer confidence in the american government. and it's proved itself dysfunctional time and again over the last couple of years. what you hear now is not how people believe that there's going to be some last-minute deal, but how they remember the times that the t.a.r.p. bill, the fiscal bailout a few ye
on africa and many believe now is the time. this is an overgeneralization. the rule of law is not widespread enough in the continent. there is a glimmer of hope such as sun nish sha. countries such as egypt still questionable. we have seen mass rioting there and growing concerns whether the new rule of law and new constitution will effectively protect investors. >> just a few years ago, there were maybe 10 frontier emerging funds. now, there's more than 300. they're the hot thing. remember, even if there is growth there, very little liquidity. that's not a real place for mom and pop investors. that's still a white knuckle place even if there is growth. >> i'm looking at global industries 52 week highs, turkey, france, uk. lithuania, japan. can those do well? >> i think so. they're coming off their bottom. europe 20 through wh-- europe 2 what was our 2008. >> you think merkel gets re-elected? >> at this point. she seems to be doing okay. if merkel gets re-elected, she will be a major outlier. the general rule of thumb for almost all politician, you never survive a debt crisis. germany doesn't
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)